Institute of Communication and Media Studies (icmb)

Team from A-Z

Since 2019, Mykola Makhortykh has been a postdoctoral researcher at the Institute of Communication and Media Science, where he is part of the project “Populist radical-right attitudes and political information behavior. A longitudinal study of attitude development in high-choice information environments” (University of Bern & University Koblenz-Landau). In his research, Mykola examines politics- and history-centered information behaviour in online environments and how it is affected by the information retrieval systems, such as search engines and recommender systems. To achieve this goal, he combines traditional social science methods (e.g., content analysis and focus groups) with novel computational approaches (e.g., deep learning and agent-based testing). His other research interests include artificial intelligence, trauma and memory studies, in particular digital Holocaust remembrance, armed conflict reporting, cybersecurity and critical security studies, and bias in information retrieval systems.

Mykola has an interdisciplinary background, which combines communication science, humanities, data science, and computer science. He received BA in History and MA in Archaeology at the Kyiv Taras Shevchenko University, a joint MA degree in Euroculture at the University of Goettingen and Jagiellonian University, and BA in Computer Science at the University of the People. Before moving to Bern, he finished his PhD at the University of Amsterdam on the relationship between Second World War remembrance and online platforms in Eastern Europe, and worked as a postdoctoral research in Data Science at the Amsterdam School of Communication Science for the FairNews project, where Mykola studies algorithmic (un)fairness in news personalization systems.

2021

  • Urman, A., Makhortykh, M., & Ulloa, R. (2021). The Matter of Chance: Auditing Web Search Results Related to the 2020 US Presidential Primary Elections Across Six Search Engines. Social Science Computer Review. doi: https://doi.org/10.1177/08944393211006863.
     
  • Urman, A. & Makhortykh, M. (2021). There can be only one truth: Ideological segregation and online news communities in Ukraine. Global Media & Communication. doi: https://doi.org/10.1177/17427665211009930.
     
  • Urman, A., Makhortykh, M., and Ulloa, R. (2021). Auditing Source Diversity Bias in Video Search Results Using Virtual Agents. In Companion Proceedings of the Web Conference 2021 (WWW '21) (pp. 232–236). Association for Computing Machinery. doi: https://doi.org/10.1145/3442442.3452306.
     
  • Zarouali, B., Makhortykh, M., Bastian, M., & Araujo, T. (2021). Overcoming polarization with chatbot news? Investigating the impact of news content containing opposing views on agreement and credibility. European Journal of Communication, 36(1), 53-68. doi: https://doi.org/10.1177/0267323120940908.

2020

  • Bastian, M., Makhortykh, M., Harambam, J. & van Drunen, M. (2020). Explanations of news personalisation across media types and systems. Internet Policy Review, 9(4), 1-34. doi: https://doi.org/10.14763/2020.4.1504.
     
  • Makhortykh, M., de Vreese, C., Helberger, N., Harambam, J., & Bountouridis, D. (2020). We are what we click: Understanding time and content-based habits of online news readers. New Media & Society (online first). doi: https://doi.org/10.1177/1461444820933221.
     
  • Makhortykh, M. (2020). Historical memory and securitisation of the Russian intervention in Syria. International Politics, 57, 1063-1081. doi: https://doi.org/10.1057/s41311-020-00232-w.
     
  • Makhortykh, M., & González Aguilar, J. M. (2020). Memory, politics and emotions: internet memes and protests in Venezuela and Ukraine. Continuum, 34(3), 342-362. doi: https://doi.org/10.1080./10304312.2020.1764782
     
  • Makhortykh, M., & Bastian, M. (2020). Personalizing the war: Perspectives for the adoption of news recommendation algorithms in the media coverage of the conflict in Eastern Ukraine. Media, War & Conflict (online first). doi: https://doi.org/10.1177/1750635220906254.
     
  • Makhortykh, M., Lyebyedyev, Y., & Kravtsov, D. (2020). Past Is Another Resource: Remembering the 70th Anniversary of the Victory Day on LiveJournal. Nationalities Papers, 49(2), 375-388. doi: https://doi.org/10.1017/nps.2019.64.
     
  • Makhortykh, M., Urman, A., & Ulloa, R. (2020). How search engines disseminate information about COVID-19 and why they should do better. The Harvard Kennedy School Misinformation Review, 1(1), 1-12. doi: https://doi.org/10.37016/mr-2020-017.
     
  • Makhortykh, M. (2020). Remediating the past: YouTube and Second World War memory in Ukraine and Russia. Memory Studies, 13(2), 146-161. doi: https://doi.org/10.1177/1750698017730867.
     
  • Helberger, N., Poort, J., & Makhortykh, M. (2020). Four tales of sci-fi and information law. Internet Policy Review, 9(1), 1-8. doi: https://dx.doi.org/10.14763/2020.1.1457.
     
  • Makhortykh, M., Urman, A. & Ulloa, R. (2020). The more knowledge, the more grief: Auditing how search engine algorithms structure memories about mass atrocities. In Proceedings of DHBenelux 2020 (pp. 1-3). Zenodo. doi: https://dx.doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.3871925.

2019

  • Makhortykh, M. and Sydorova, M. (2019). Animating the subjugated past: Digital greeting cards as a form of counter-memory. Visual Communication (online first). doi: https://doi.org/10.1177/1470357219890636.
     
  • Bastian, M., Makhortykh, M. and Dobber, T. (2019). News personalization for peace: how algorithmic recommendations can impact conflict coverage. International Journal of Conflict Management, 30(3), 309-328. doi: https://doi.org/10.1108/IJCMA-02-2019-0032.
     
  • Makhortykh, M. (2019). Nurturing the pain: Audiovisual tributes to the Holocaust on YouTube. Holocaust Studies, 25(4), 441-466. doi: https://doi.org/10.1080/17504902.2018.1468667.
     
  • Harambam, J., Bountouridis, D.,  Makhortykh, M. and van Hoboken, J. (2019).  Power to the people! A qualitative evaluation of user control in recommendation systems. In Proceedings of the RecSys 2019 (pp. 69-77). New York: ACM Press.
     
  • Bountouridis, D., Makhortykh, M., Sullivan, E., Harambam, J., Tintarev, N. and Hauff, C. (2019). Annotating credibility: Identifying and mitigating bias in credibility datasets. In Proceedings of the SIGIR Workshop on Reducing Online Misinformation Exposure (pp. 1-10). New York: ACM Press.
     
  • Sullivan, E., Bountouridis, D., Harambam, J., Najafian, S., Loecherbach, F., Makhortykh, M., Kelen, D., Wilkinson, D., Graus, D., Tintarev, N. (2019). Reading news with a purpose: Explaining user profiles for self-actualization. In Proceedings of the UMAP International Workshop on Transparent Personalization Methods based on Heterogeneous Personal Data (pp. 241-245).  New York: ACM Press.
     
  • Soldner, F., Ho, J.C., Makhortykh, M., van der Vegt, I., Mozes, M. and Kleinberg, B. (2019). Uphill from here: Sentiment patterns in videos from left- and right-wing YouTube news channels. In Proceedings of the Third Workshop on Natural Language Processing and Computational Social Science (pp. 84-93). New York: ACM Press.
     
  • Bountouridis, D., Harambam, J., Makhortykh, M., Marrero, M., Tintarev, N., Hauff, C. (2019). SIREN: A simulation framework for understanding the effects of recommender systems in online news environments. In Proceedings of the ACM FAT* Conference on Fairness, Accountability, and Transparency (pp. 150-159). New York: ACM Press.

2018

  • Menyhért, A. and Makhortykh, M. (2018). From individual trauma to frozen currents: Conceptualising digital trauma studies. Studies in Russian Eurasian, and Central European New Media, 18(18), 1-8.
     
  • Makhortykh, M. (2018). Framing the Holocaust online: Memory of the Babi Yar massacres on Wikipedia. Studies in Russian Eurasian, and Central European New Media, 18(18), 67-94.
     
  • Makhortykh, M. (2018). Remediating violence: Second World War memory on Wikipedia. Remembrance and Solidarity Studies, 6, 123-145.
     
  • Kaprans, M. and Makhortykh, M. (2018). Discussing wartime collaboration in a transnational digital space: The framing of the UPA and the Latvian Legion in Wikipedia. In E. Narvselius and G. Grinchenko (Eds.) Formulas of betrayal: Traitors, collaborators and deserters in contemporary European politics of memory (pp. 169-197). London: Palgrave Macmillan
     
  • Makhortykh, M. (2018). #NoKievNazi: Social media, historical memory and securitization in the Ukraine crisis. In V. Strukov and V. Apryshchenko (Eds.), Memory and securitization in contemporary Europe (pp. 219-249). London: Palgrave Macmillan.
     
  • Lyebyedyev, E., & Makhortykh, M. (2018). #Euromaidan: Quantitative analysis of multilingual framing 2013–2014 Ukrainian protests on Twitter. In Proceedings of the 2018 IEEE Second International Conference on Data Stream Mining and Processing (pp. 276-280). New York: IEEE.

2017

  • Makhortykh, M. (2017). War memories and online encyclopedias: Framing 30 June 1941 on Wikipedia. Journal of Educational Media, Memory, and Society, 9(2), 40-68.  DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.3167/jemms.2017.090203.
     
  • Makhortykh, M. and Sydorova, M. (2017). Social media and visual framing of the conflict in Eastern Ukraine. Media, War and Conflict, 10(3), 359-381. doi: https://doi.org/10.1177/1750635217702539.
     
  • Makhortykh, M. (2017). Tsifrovye praktiki pominoveniia v Knige pogibshikh za Ukrainu [Digital сommemoration practices in the Book of Deceased for Ukraine]. Proceedings of the International conference “Anthropology of the victim: From archaic roots to contemporary contexts” (pp. 58-72). Samara: Samara Academy of Humanities.

2015

  • Makhortykh, M. and Lyebyedyev, Y. (2015). #SaveDonbassPeople: Twitter, propaganda, and conflict in Eastern Ukraine. The Communication Review, 18(4), 239-270. doi: https://doi.org/10.1080/10714421.2015.1085776.
     
  • Makhortykh, M. (2015). Everything for the lulz: Historical memes and World War II memory on Lurkomor’e. Studies in Russian Eurasian, and Central European New Media, 13(13), 63-90.
     
  • Makhortykh, M. (2015). Identity, memory and new media: Inventing the history of Ukraine in Wikipedia. In R. van der Laarse, M. Cherenkov, V. Proshak, and T. Mykhalchuk (Eds.) Religion, state, society, and identity in transition Ukraine (pp. 241-261). Nijmegen: WLP.

2014

  • Fredheim, R., Howanitz, G. and Makhortykh, M. (2014). Scraping the monumental: Stepan Bandera through the lens of quantitative memory studies. Studies in Russian Eurasian, and Central European New Media, 12(12), 25–53.

2021

  • Kuznetsova, E. & Makhortykh, M. (2021). The Art of Disruption: RT’s Social Media Strategies. Conference AgendaFifth Annual Tartu Conference on Russian and East European Studies (online conference). 6-8 June 2021.
     
  • Christner, C. & Makhortykh, M. (2021). Who Encounters Disinformation Online and Why? Investigating Predictors of Exposure to Disinformation. ICA 2021 (online conference). 27-31 May 2021.
     
  • de Leon, E., Makhortykh, M., Gil-Lopez, T. & Silke, A. (2021 ). Rally `Round what Flag? The Role of Media Consumption during the COVID-19 Pandemic for the Development of Political Trust in Switzerland. ICA 2021 (online conference). 27-31 May 2021.
     
  • de Leon, E., Makhortykh, M., & Urman, A. (2021 ). Where did you come from, where did you go? Pathways to news in Germany and Switzerland. ICA 2021 (online conference). 27-31 May 2021.
     
  • Dovbysh, O., Makhortykh, M., & Wijermars, M. (2021). How to reach Nirvana: Yandex, news personalisation and the future of Russian journalistic media. ICA 2021 (online conference). 27-31 May 2021.
     
  • González, J. and Makhortykh, M. (2021). Us vs. Them: Internet memes and construction of (counter)protest identities in Ukraine and Venezuela. ICA 2021 (online conference). 27-31 May 2021.
     
  • Makhortykh, M., Urman, A., & Ulloa, R. (2021 ). Auditing algorithmic content curation on search engines using virtual agents. ICA 2021 (online conference). 27-31 May 2021.
     
  • Makhortykh, M., Urman, A., & Ulloa, R. (2021 ). Hey, Google, is it what the Holocaust really looked like? Auditing biases in visual representation of the Holocaust on web search engines. ICA 2021 (online conference). 27-31 May 2021.
     
  • Urman, A., Makhortykh, M., & Ulloa, R. (2021). Visual representation of migrants in Web search results. ICA 2021 (online conference). 27-31 May 2021.
     
  • Urman, A. & Makhortykh, M. (2021). Do women "sell" better than men? Auditing gender and ethnic biases in Google search results. ICA 2021 (online conference). 27-31 May 2021.
     
  • Dovbysh, O., Wijermars, M., & Makhortykh, M. (2021). How to reach Nirvana: Yandex, news personalisation and the future of Russian journalistic media. CMSTW 2021 (online conference). 20-21 April 2021.
     
  • Urman, A., Makhortykh, M., & Ulloa, R. (2021). Auditing source diversity bias in video search results using virtual agents. Third Workshop on Fairness, Accountability, Transparency, Ethics and Society on the Web (FATES on the Web 2021) (virtual workshop). 12 April 2021.
     
  • Makhortykh, M., Urman, A. & Ulloa, R. (2021). Hey, Google, tell me what the Holocaust looked like: Visual framing of mass atrocities by search engines. DACH 21: Kommunikation #(R)Evolution (online conference). April 7-9.
     
  • Makhortykh, M., Urman, A. & Ulloa, R. (2021). Scaling virtual agent-based testing for cross-platform analysis of algorithmic content curation. DACH 21: Kommunikation #(R)Evolution (online conference). April 7-9.
     
  • Makhortykh, M., Adam, S., Maier, M., Urman, A., Gil-Lopez, T., Christner, C. (2021). News at the time of crisis: Comparing desktop- and mobile-based browsing behaviour during COVID-19 pandemic. DACH 21: Kommunikation #(R)Evolution (online conference). April 7-9.
     
  • Adam, S., Makhortykh, M., Urman, A., Christner, C., Gil-Lopez, T., & Maier, M. (2021). Media consumption and conspiracy beliefs in COVID-19 times – combing tracking and survey research. DACH 21: Kommunikation #(R)Evolution (online conference). April 7-9.
     
  • Kuznetsova, L. & Makhortykh, M. (2021). Blame it on the algorithm? Russian media and curation of news on Facebook. 6th HSE International Conference “Digital Media for the Future” (online conference). April 6-9.
     
  • Makhortykh, M., Urman, A., & Ulloa, R. (2021). Detecting race and gender bias in visual representation of AI on web search engines. Second International Workshop on Algorithmic Bias in Search and Recommendation (Bias 2021) (virtual workshop). 1 April 2021.

2020

  • Kuznetsova, E. & Makhortykh, M. (2020). The Art of Disruption: RT’s Social Media Strategies. ASEEES (virtual conference). 5-8 & 14-15 November 2020.
     
  • Urman, A., Makhortykh, M., Ulloa, R. (2020). Algorithmic auditing of search engines: The 2020 US presidential election campaign. Digital Democracy Workshop (virtual conference). 5-6 November 2020.
     
  • Makhortykh, M. & Urman, A. (2020). The great randomizer: Using virtual agents for auditing the effects of YouTube algorithm on ideologically-charged news content distribution. AoIR (virtual conference). 26-31 October 2020.
     
  • Urman, A., Makhortykh, M., & Ulloa, R. (2020). Auditing search engines: the case of the 2020 US presidential election campaign. SocInfo 2020 (virtual conference). 6-9 October 2020.
     
  • González, J. and Makhortykh, M. (2020). #VenezuelaLibre vs. #RussiaWithUs: Protest identities construction in Ukraine and Venezuela through Internet memes. 26th International Congress of the SEP: Journalism for Social Transformation (virtual conference). 18-19 September 2020.
     
  • Urman, A. & Makhortykh, M. (2020). Do bots and trolls speak the same language? Actor-based analysis of computational propaganda in a multilingual setting. ECPR 2020 (virtual conference). 24-28 August 2020.
     
  • Makhortykh, M., Urman, A. & Ulloa, R. (2020). This is what pandemic looks like: Visual framing of COVID-19 on search engines. ECPR 2020 (virtual conference). 24-28 August 2020.
     
  • Makhortykh, M., Urman, A. & Ulloa, R. (2020). The more knowledge, the more grief: Auditing how search engine algorithms structure memories about mass atrocities. Digital Humanities Benelux 2020 (virtual conference). 3-5 June 2020.
     
  • Zarouali, B., Makhortykh, M., Bastian, M. & Araujo, T. (2020). Investigating the Impact of Chatbot News Content Containing Opposing Views on Agreement and Credibility. 70th Annual ICA Conference (virtual conference). 20-26 May 2020.
     
  • Makhortykh, M., Urman, A., Gil-Lopez, T. & Ulloa, R. (2020). To Track or Not to Track: Examining Perceptions of Online Tracking in the Context of Information Behaviour Research. 70th Annual ICA Conference (virtual conference). 20-26 May 2020.
     
  • Merten, L., Metoui, N., Makhortykh, M., Trilling, D. & Moeller, J. (2020). News Won't Find Me? Exploring Inequalities in Social Media News Use With Tracking Data. 70th Annual ICA Conference (virtual conference). 20-26 May 2020.
     
  • Makhortykh, M. & Bastian, M. (2020). Algorithmic Personalization, Human Rights and Individual/Collective Digital Memory Legislation. Critical Thinking on Memory and Human Rights Second Annual Workshop. 20-21 February. Frankfurt am Main, Germany.

2019

  • Makhortykh, M. (2019). Conceptualising visuality in digital trauma studies: Audiovisual tributes to the Holocaust on YouTube. Interdisciplinary workshop "Historicity of the Visuality and Image History: New Forms of Digital and Visual History/Humanities". 14-15 November. Lviv, Ukraine.
     
  • Makhortykh, M. (2019). Algorithms of memory: Qualitative and quantitative methods for studying collective memory on YouTube. Interdisciplinary workshop "Historicity of the Visuality and Image History: New Forms of Digital and Visual History/Humanities". 14-15 November. Lviv, Ukraine.
     
  • Makhortykh, M., Urman, A. Christner, C. and Gil-Lopez, T. (2019). Veritas ex machina: A critical review of automated approaches for detecting political disinformation online. Digikomm 2019: Automating Communication in the Networked Society: Contexts, Consequences, Critique. 6-8 November. Berlin, Germany.
     
  • Makhortykh, M. (2019). We were hungry, but we also were free: (Counter)narratives of the Russia’s first post-Soviet decade on Instagram. 9th Genealogies of Memory Conference "Myths, Memories and Economies: Post-Socialist Transformations in Comparison". 28-30 October, 2019. Warsaw, Poland.
     
  • Urman, A. and Makhortykh, M. (2019). Trolls, bots and everyone else: Online disinformation campaigns and 2019 presidential elections in Ukraine. Aleksanteri Conference 2019 "Technology, Culture, and Society in Eurasian Space". 23-25 October, 2019. Helsinki, Finland.
     
  • González, J. and Makhortykh, M. (2019). Re-mixing memories, re-shaping protests: Historical internet memes as a means of framing protest campaigns in Ukraine and Venezuela. Aleksanteri Conference 2019 "Technology, Culture, and Society in Eurasian Space". 23-25 October, 2019. Helsinki, Finland.
     
  • Urman, A. and Makhortykh, M. (2019). Webs of deception: Detecting and measuring the diffusion of online disinformation during the elections in Ukraine. Digital Societies 2019. 25-27 September, 2019. Konstanz, Germany.
     
  • Harambam, J., Bountouridis, D.,  Makhortykh, M. and van Hoboken, J. (2019).  Power to the people! A qualitative evaluation of user control in recommendation systems. RecSys 2019. 16-20 September, 2019. Copenhagen, Denmark.
     
  • Bastian, M. and Makhortykh, M. (2019). The same but different? Constructing the history of the Holocaust on Wikipedia. Digital Humanities Benelux 2019 Conference. 11-13 September, 2019. Liège, Belgium.
     
  • Makhortykh, M. and Metoui, N. (2019). Protecting the bytes of the past: Information security and digital-born cultural heritage. Digital Humanities Benelux 2019 Conference. 11-13 September, 2019. Liège, Belgium.
     
  • González, J. and Makhortykh, M. (2019). Re-mixing histories, re-shaping protests: Internet memes as a form of (counter)resistance in Ukraine and Venezuela. ECREA Communication History Section Workshop "Jeopardizing Democracy throughout History: Media as Accomplice, Adversary or Amplifier of Populist and Radical Politics". 11-13 September, 2019. Vienna, Austria.
     
  • Bastian, M. and Makhortykh, M. (2019). Algorithms as a peacekeeping force? Automated systems of news distribution and peace journalism. SciCar 2019. 9-11 September, 2019. Dortmund, Germany.
     
  • Makhortykh, M. (2019). Remembering war, forgetting peace: Historical memory and securitisation of the Russian intervention in Syria. ECPR General Conference. 4-7 September, 2019. Wrocław, Poland.
     
  • Makhortykh, M. and Urman, A. (2019). Trolls, bots and everyone else: Online disinformation campaigns and 2019 presidential elections in Ukraine. 3rd European Symposium on Societal Challenges in Computational Social Science. 2-4 September, 2019. Zurich, Switzerland.
     
  • Soldner, F., Ho, J.C., Makhortykh, M., van der Vegt, I., Mozes, M. and Kleinberg, B. (2019). Uphill from here: Sentiment patterns in videos from left- and right-wing YouTube news channels. 3rd European Symposium on Societal Challenges in Computational Social Science. 2-4 September, 2019. Zurich, Switzerland.
     
  • Bountouridis, D., Makhortykh, M., Sullivan, E., Harambam, J., Tintarev, N. and Hauff, C. (2019). Annotating credibility: Identifying and mitigating bias in credibility datasets. SIGIR Workshop on Reducing Online Misinformation Exposure (ROME 2019). 25 July, 2019. Paris, France.
     
  • Aigenseer, V., Adam, S., Maier, M., Urman, A., Christner, C., Makhortykh, M. and Gil-Lopez, T. (2019). WebTrack – tracking users’ online information behavior while screen-scraping content. IC2S2 2019. 17-20 July, 2019. Amsterdam, Netherlands.
     
  • Makhortykh, M., de Vreese, C., Helberger, N., Harambam, J. and Bountouridis, D. (2019). We are what we click: Understanding time- and content-based habits of online news readers. IC2S2 2019. 17-20 July, 2019. Amsterdam, Netherlands.
     
  • Merten, L., Metoui, N., Makhortykh, M., Trilling, D. and Moeller, J. (2019).
     
  • News won’t find me? Exploring potential digital inequalities in social media news use. IC2S2 2019. 17-20 July, 2019. Amsterdam, Netherlands.
     
  • Bastian, M., Makhortykh, M. and Dobber, T. (2019). News personalization for peace: How algorithmic content distribution can impact conflict coveпо rage. IAMCR 2019. 7-11 July, 2019. Madrid, Spain.
     
  • Bastian, M. and Makhortykh, M. (2019). The neutral point of view and the black hole of Auschwitz: Crowdsourcing the history of the Holocaust on Wikipedia. International conference “Holocaust Studies in the Digital Age”. 2 July, 2019. Amsterdam, Netherlands.
     
  • Sydorova, M. and Makhortykh, M. (2019). Animating the subjugated past: E-cards as a form of counter-memory. 3rd Annual Memory Studies Association Conference. 25-28 June 2019. Madrid, Spain.
     
  • Makhortykh, M. and Bastian, M. (2019). Customizing the past: Algorithmic news recommenders as agents of collective remembrance. 3rd Annual Memory Studies Association Conference. 25-28 June 2019. Madrid, Spain.
     
  • Metoui, N. and Makhortykh, M. (2019). Protecting past and future choices: Identifying and evaluating functional vulnerabilities in recommender systems. Connected Life 2019. 24-25 June, 2019. Oxford and London, UK.
     
  • Sullivan, E., Bountouridis, D., Harambam, J., Najafian, S., Loecherbach, F., Makhortykh, M., Kelen, D., Wilkinson, D., Graus, D., Tintarev, N. (2019). Reading news with a purpose: Explaining user profiles for self-actualization. UMAP International Workshop on Transparent Personalization Methods based on Heterogeneous Personal Data. 9-12 June, 2019. Larnaca, Cyprus.
     
  • Soldner, F., Ho, J.C., Makhortykh, M., van der Vegt, I., Mozes, M. and Kleinberg, B. (2019). Uphill from here: Sentiment patterns in videos from left- and right-wing YouTube news channels. NLP+CSS workshop (NAACL 2019). 6 June, 2019. Minneapolis, MI, United States.
     
  • Makhortykh, M. and Metoui, N. (2019). When digital manuscripts burn: Information security and digital heritage in Eastern Europe. International workshop "Politics of e-heritage: Production and regulation of digital memory in Eastern Europe and Russia". 3-4 June, 2019. Marburg, Germany.
     
  • Urman, A. and Makhortykh, M. (2019). East is East, and West is West: Ideological segregation and online news communities in Ukraine. 69th Annual ICA Conference. 24-28 May, 2019. Washington, DC, United States.
     
  • Wijermars, M. and Makhortykh, M. (2019). Can echo chambers protect information freedom? Algorithmic news recommenders and public sphere in Eastern Europe. 69th Annual ICA Conference. Washington, DC, United States.
     
  • Makhortykh, M. (2019). East is East and West is West? Negotiating divided memories on Wikipedia. International conference “Narratives of Europe’s Shared Past: Between Singularity of the Holocaust and Totalitarian Paradigm”. 16-17 May 2019. Brussels, Belgium.
     
  • Harambam, J. and Makhortykh, M. (2019). News for one and all: Algorithmic personalization as the future imaginary of the news industry. International workshop “Realities and Fantasies”. 10-12 April, Amsterdam, Netherlands.
     
  • Bountouridis, D., Harambam, J. and Makhortykh, M. (2019). FairNews: News in a Big Data era. VWData symposium. 18 March 2019, Amersfoort, Netherlands.
     
  • Makhortykh, M., Harambam, J. and Bountouridis, D. (2019). FairNews: Realizing fairness in news personalization. 1st Dutch-Belgian Personalization Network workshop. 11 February 2019, Amsterdam, Netherlands.
     
  • Makhortykh, M., Bastian, M. and Dobber, T. (2019). News personalization for peace: How algorithmic content distribution can impact conflict coverage. Etmaal van de Communicatiewetenschap 2019. 7-8 February, 2019, Nijmegen, Netherlands.
     
  • Bountouridis, D., Harambam, J., Makhortykh, M., Marrero, M., Tintarev, N. and Hauff, C. (2019). SIREN: A simulation framework for understanding the effects of recommender systems in online news environments. ACM FAT*. 29-31 January, Atlanta, US.

2018

  • Makhortykh, M. and Urman, A. (2018). There can be only one truth: Ideological segregation and online news communities in Ukraine. European Symposium Series on Societal Challenges in Computational Social Science. 5-7 December, 2018, Cologne, Germany.
     
  • Bastian, M., Makhortykh, M. and Dobber, T. (2018). Algorithms for peace: How news recommender systems can facilitate constructive conflict reporting. European Symposium Series on Societal Challenges in Computational Social Science. 5-7 December, 2018, Cologne, Germany.
     
  • Makhortykh, M. (2018). Yura, we are sorry: Internet memes as a means of remediating post-Soviet nostalgia. International conference “Communicative forms and practices of nostalgia: Conceptual, critical and historical perspectives.” 8-9 November, 2018, Stockholm, Sweden.
     
  • Harambam, J., Bountouridis, D. and Makhortykh, M. (2018). FairNews: Fairness in news personalization. 1st VWData research meeting. 7 November, 2018, Utrecht, Netherlands.
     
  • Makhortykh, M. and Bastian, M. (2018). Recommended memories: Collective remembrance and algorithmic news personalization. ECREA preconference “Towards a polyphony of memory? Media, communication and memory in the digital age.” 31 October, 2018, Lugano, Switzerland.
     
  • Bastian, M., Harambam, J. and Makhortykh, M. (2018). Personalizing the news: How media outlets communicate their algorithmic recommendation practices online. Amsterdam Privacy Conference 2018. 5-8 October, Amsterdam, Netherlands.
     
  • Bastian, M. and Makhortykh, M. (2018). Personalized conflict coverage as a major challenge for a democratic public sphere: The case of the war in Eastern Ukraine. AMIRetreat 2018. 27-29 September, 2018, Thessaloniki, Greece.
     
  • Harambam, J., Bountouridis, D. and Makhortykh, M. (2018). Wizard, be my algorithm today! Democratizing recommender systems with algorithmic personae. Small Big Data Congress 2018. 27 September, 2018, Hague, Netherlands.
     
  • Makhortykh, M., Bastian, M. and Möller, J. (2018). Hi, I am your bot: The role of chatbots in a changing news environment. SciCar 2018. 24-26 September, 2018, Dortmund, Germany.
     
  • Makhortykh, M. (2018). Historical memory and securitisation of the Russian intervention in Syria. 12th Pan-European conference on International Relations. 12-15 September, 2018, Prague, Czech Republic.
     
  • Makhortykh, M. and Sydorova, M. (2018). Daemon ex Machina: Arcane algorithmization as a narrative device and immersion technique. GFF 2018. 5-8 September, 2018, Freiburg, Switzerland.
     
  • Lyebyedyev, E., & Makhortykh, M. (2018). #Euromaidan: Quantitative analysis of multilingual framing 2013–2014 Ukrainian protests on Twitter. Second International Conference on Data Stream Mining and Processing. 21-25 August, 2018, Lviv, Ukraine.
     
  • Makhortykh, M. and Harambam, J. (2018). Who controls the algorithm? Conceptualizing agenda-setting in the context of a personalized news media ecosystem. ECPR General Conference. 22-25 August, 2018, Hamburg, Germany.
     
  • Makhortykh, M. (2018). Charting the conflicted borders: Narrating the conflict in Eastern Ukraine through digital maps. International conference “The Power of Borderland(s): In Media's Res.” June 28-29, 2018, Greifswald, Germany.
     
  • Makhortykh, M. and Bastian, M. (2018). Personalising the conflict: Perspectives for the adoption of algorithms in media coverage of the war in Eastern Ukraine. International workshop “Media Systems under Pressure: Recent Developments in Media Freedom in Central and Eastern Europe.” 18 May, 2018, Amsterdam, Netherlands.
     
  • Harambam J. and Makhortykh M. (2018). All the news you want to read: Personalization as the future imaginary of the news industry. International workshop “We are on a mission. Exploring the role of future imaginaries.” April 27 2018, Berlin, Germany.

2017

  • Makhortykh, M. (2017). Digital media as a transnational memory agency: Remembering MH17 in Wikipedia. MSA 2nd annual conference. 14-16 December, 2017, Copenhagen, Denmark.
     
  • Makhortykh, M. (2017). Digital commemoration practices in the Book of Deceased for Ukraine. International conference “Anthropology of the victim: From archaic roots to contemporary contexts.” October 12-14, Samara, Russia.
     
  • Makhortykh, M. and Sydorova, M. (2017). Crimson Sand: Memories and fantasies of the Soviet-Afghan war. GFF 2017. September 20-24, 2017, Vienna, Austria.
     
  • Makhortykh, M. (2017). Digital patriotism: Affective involvement in political blogs on Russian social media. International workshop “Political feelings in participatory media.” July 6, 2017, Amsterdam, Netherlands.
     
  • Makhortykh, M. and Sydorova, M. (2017). Victory gif(t)s: Second World War memory and animated E-cards. International conference “Animation and Memory.” June 22-23, 2017, Nijmingen, Netherlands.
     
  • Makhortykh, M. (2017). #Euromaidan: Framing the Ukrainian protests of 2013-2014 on Twitter. International symposium “Public lives/private platform: The politics of Twitter.” May 23-24, 2017, Amsterdam, Netherlands.
     
  • Makhortykh, M. (2017). Encyclopedizing the  Holocaust: Memory about the Babi Yar massacres in Wikipedia. International workshop “Trauma studies in the digital age.” May 10-12, 2017, Amsterdam, Netherlands.
     
  • Makhortykh, M. (2017). Digital tombstones: Post-mortem profiles of Ukrainian/Russian combatants on VKontakte. Digital Emotions research group meeting. April 7, 2017, Amsterdam, Netherlands.

2016

  • Makhortykh, M. (2016). Tweeting (in)security: Social media, historical memory, and securitisation in the Ukraine crisis. International workshop “Memory and media in the crisis around Ukraine.” March 21, 2016, Amsterdam, Netherlands.

2015

  • Makhortykh, M. (2015). Immortal regiment, forgotten soldiers: Digital memory practices and the Victory Day in Ukraine and Russia. Workshop Slavistenmiddag. November 26, 2015, Amsterdam, Netherlands.
     
  • Makhortykh, M. and Kaprans, M. (2015).Memory wars and memory truce: Transnational framing of UPA and Latvian Legion on Wikipedia. International workshop “Formulas for betrayal: Traitors, deserters and collaborators in European politics of memory.” June 23-24, 2015, Lund, Sweden.
     
  • Makhortykh, M. (2015). Social media and visual framing of the conflict in Eastern Ukraine. International  conference “Platform Ukraine.” June 6-7, 2015, London, United Kingdom.
     
  • Makhortykh, M. and Sydorova, M. (2015). Metrics for memory: Measuring and predicting consumption of past on YouTube. Webdatanet 2015. 26-28 May, 2015, Salamanca, Spain.
     
  • Makhortykh, M. (2015). The Great Patriotic War revisited: Ukrainian media and securitisation of the Ukrainian crisis. BASEES Annual Conference. March 28-30, 2015, Cambridge, United Kingdom.
     
  • Makhortykh, M. (2015). #stopfascism: Web wars in post-Euromaidan Ukraine. Vlaams-Nederlandse Slavistendagen 2014. November 14-15, 2014, Amsterdam, Netherlands.

2014

  • Makhortykh, M. (2014). The propaganda will be tweeted: Social media and protests in Eastern Ukraine. International  conference “Contemporary forms of protest in the Euro-Asian space.” October 23-24, 2014, Hamburg, Germany.
     
  • Makhortykh, M. (2014). War memories and online encyclopedias: Framing 30 June in Wikipedia. International  conference “School vs. Memory.” October 10-11, 2014, Prague, Czech Republic.
     
  • Makhortykh, M. and Sydorova, M. (2014). The past is a foreign platform? Exploring World-War-II memory on Twitter. Digital Humanities Summer School 2014. September 8-10, 2014, Leuven, Belgium.
     
  • Makhortykh, M. (2014). World-War-II memory and securitisation in the Ukrainian Crisis 2013-2014. International workshop “Memory and security(zation) in contemporary Europe.” June 26-27, 2014, Rostov-na-Donu, Russia.
     
  • Makhortykh, M. (2014). From material to digital: Remediating World-War-II Memory through Twitter. International conference “Things to remember.” June 4-6, 2014, Nijmingen, Netherlands.
     
  • Makhortykh, M. (2014). Identity, memory and new media: Inventing the history of Ukraine in Wikipedia. International symposium “Ukrainian identities: A transdisciplinary perspective.” May 7, 2014, Amsterdam, Netherlands.

2013

  • Makhortykh, M. (2013). We need to talk (more) about digital humanities. Roundtable with Alexander Etkind, Ellen Rutten, Ilia Kukulin, Ekaterina Lapina-Kratasiuk, Mykola Makhortykh, Gernot Howanitz. ASEEES 2013. November 23, 2013, Boston, MA, United States.
     
  • Makhortykh, M. (2013). Digital, transnational...cosmopolitan? World-War-II Memory in post-analog age. International conference “Competing memories.” October 30, 2013, Amsterdam, Netherlands.
     
  • Makhortykh, M. (2013). Conflict, remembrance and big data: Twitter and World-War-II memory. International conference “Digital testimonies on war and trauma.” June, 12-14, 2013, Rotterdam, Netherlands.
     
  • Makhortykh, M. (2013). Between #BOB and #Weltkrieg: Twitter and WWII Memory. Workshop “Heritage and memory of conflict.” May 7, 2013, Amsterdam, Netherlands.
     
  • Makhortykh, M. (2013). Transnational memory and Ukrainian social media. Workshop “CULTUURgeschiedenis versus cultuurGESCHIEDENIS.” April 3, 2013, Amsterdam, Netherlands.
     
  • Makhortykh, M. (2013). Different shades of neutrality: World-War-II memories in Wikipedia. Workshop “Digitization and (trans-)national memory.” March 17, 2013, Amsterdam, Netherlands.
     
  • Makhortykh, M. (2013). Memory dynamics in Wikipedia: Quantitative study of World War II representations. Digital Methods Winter School 2013. January 23, 2013, Amsterdam, Netherlands.

2012

  • Makhortykh, M. (2012). From myths to memes: Transnational memory and Ukrainian social media. Vlaams-Nederlandse Slavistendagen 2012. October 25, 2012, Groningen, Netherlands.

Research interests

  • Algorithmic auditing
  • Armed conflict reporting and framing
  • Artificial intelligence
  • Critical security studies and cybersecurity
  • Computational social science
  • Digitization of cultural heritage
  • Information retrieval
  • Memory and trauma studies